How to Check Water Temperature Without Thermometer

How to Check Water Temperature Without Thermometer?

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Checking the temperature of the water can be easy when you have a thermometer around you. However, what will you do if somehow you lose the thermometer and checking the temperature of the water is an emergency?

Well, sometimes the old ways unlock the new doors, and today you need to be old-school. We will teach you how you can check water temperature without a thermometer pretty quickly.

No, it won’t give you the exact result. However, you’ll have an idea if the water is too hot or too cold for you that we can ensure. The only thing you’ll need to do is follow the steps perfectly. Do you want to know how it’s done? Let’s get to it.

How to Check Water Temperature Without Thermometer

We’ve talked about ten steps that you can do to check the temperature of the water. Read the following and try to implement.

Holding Your Hand above Water

Hold your hand above the water pot or water jar. In this way, you will get a rough idea of the temperature of the water. If you feel the heat, then the water is hot and might burn your skin. If not, then the water is simply cold or at room temperature.

Dip Your Elbow

 Dip your elbow in the water. You will instantly get to know whether the water is hot, lukewarm, cold, or at room temperature.

Dip Your Elbow for 5-10 Seconds

Dip one of your elbows in the water and keep it like that for 5-10 seconds. In this way, you will get an approximate idea of the temperature of the water.

Condensation on Water Container

If you place the water in a pot or container, and if the water is colder than the surrounding air, you will notice that condensation has started to occur on the outside area of the pot or container. Condensation will take place rapidly if the water is in a very cold state.

What If Ice Starts to Form?

If the water is very much cold and begins to freeze, then you will notice that tiny layers of ice have begun to form around the sides of the container. In this freezing state, the water is nearly in 32 °F or 0 °C.

If You See Small Bubbles (While It Is Heating) 

While the water is heating, look for small-sized “shrimp eyes” lookalike bubbles on the bottom of the pan or pot. If you find tiny bubbles, then the water is approximately 160 °F or 71 °C.

If You See Medium-Sized Bubbles

If you continue to heat the water, then the bubbles on the bottom will start to grow into medium-sized “crab eyes” lookalike bubbles. This indicates that the temperature of the water is nearly 175 °F or 79 °C.

If You See Larger Sized Bubbles

The bubbles on the bottom of the pan or pot will eventually grow in size and rise to the surface of the water. At this stage, the temperature of the water is nearly 185 °F or 85 °C. You may get some rattling sound from the bottom of the pan or pot.

String of Pearls

This is the final stage before the water gets to the boiling state. Bubbles from the bottom of the pan or pot will grow in size and rise to the periphery of the water and form chains of bubbles (just like a string of pearls). At this point, the water temperature is nearly 195 to 205 °F or 91 to 96 °C.

After this phase, the water temperature will rise to 212 °F or 100 °C and start to boil.

 

Wrapping Up!

So that was pretty much everything on how to check water temperature without a thermometer. But hey, just because we’ve talked about the trick, we don’t think you will need a thermometer, though.

It’s just for an urgent case if you can’t find a thermometer. However, to get the correct idea of the temperature, you should always get one.

Resources:

1. https://www.fondriest.com/environmental-measurements/parameters/water-quality/water-temperature/

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